What to expect in each species report

What to expect in each species report

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The Status of Australian fish stocks reports 2016 contains 83 species (or species complexes) stock status assessment chapters that cover the assessment of 294 'stock' level assessments. In this edition fourteen new species were added – some of which are very iconic such as the Murray Cod, others like Orange Roughy have a chequered past. 

Each chapter describes the distribution of stocks around Australia, providing stock status classifications for each. In cases where biological stock delineation is known and biological stock numbers are not too high, information is presented at the level of biological stocks. In other cases, information is presented at the management unit or jurisdictional level.

Each chapter also includes information on the main fishing methods, the management measures, the number of vessels that catch the species, and the amount of catch from commercial, recreational and Indigenous fisheries. The effects of fishing on the marine environment are briefly described, along with mitigation measures, and an indication is given of environmental factors that can affect the stocks.

To ensure each report is robust and scientifically accurate, over 140 of Australia’s leading scientists were used and consulted (blind reviewed) to assess, review and produce the reports. In addition, the 2016 edition sees a significant change to how data—the foundation of the reports—is available. Readers will not only be able to see the data, they will be able to explore and manipulate it to gain a deeper understanding of the species. See the data tools page for more information. 

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Reporting period

This third edition of the Status of key Australian fish stocks reports presents data up to 2015—the most recent data and assessments available at the time of publishing across all Australian jurisdictions with marine fisheries. In general, data are presented on the basis of calendar years, unless otherwise indicated (that is, where financial years or fishing seasons are used instead).

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Process for production of the Status of key Australian fish stocks reports

The national Status of key Australian fish stocks reports 2016 rely on a consistent reporting framework. The framework has been designed and agreed on by the Status of key Australian fish stocks reports Advisory Group, comprising heads of fisheries research agencies in all Australian jurisdictions. The Advisory Group agreed on the process for identifying the species to be included, developed the species chapter template, and agreed on a common set of terminology and reference points against which stocks were to be assessed. The agreed approach for producing the Status of key Australian fish stocks reports was endorsed by the Australian Fisheries Management Forum. The species chapter template and classification framework were reviewed following the production of the first edition of the Status of key Australian fish stocks reports in 2012. Apart from the addition of the 'environmentally limited' classification (described above), the species chapter template and classification framework are very similar to those used in 2012.

For each of the 83 species or species complexes chosen for inclusion in the reports, the Advisory Group identified 'lead' and 'support' jurisdictions for drafting species chapters. Stock status determination was undertaken in a collaborative manner, involving the relevant experts and team members in the jurisdictions in which the stocks are managed. This process meant that the researchers engaged in studying and assessing these species were responsible for the status assessment. For stocks that are shared by multiple jurisdictions, the lead jurisdiction was responsible for facilitating a process and discussion to determine the overall status of the stocks.

The individual species chapters have been reviewed by FRDC and the Status of key Australian fish stocks reports Advisory Group. In addition, the FRDC had each chapter technical peer reviewed. The reports were provided to the relevant fisheries management agency in each Australian jurisdiction for comment.