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Blue-eye Trevalla (2020)

Hyperoglyphe antarctica

  • Timothy Emery (Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences (ABARES))
  • Anthony Roelofs (Department of Agricutlture and Fisheries, Queensland)
  • Amy Smoothey (NSW Department of Primary Industries)
  • Fabian Trinnie (Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development, Western Australia)
  • Corey Wakefield (Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development, Western Australia)
  • Jeremy Lyle (Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania)

Date Published: June 2021

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Summary

Blue-eye Trevalla is a sustainable species around the Australian coastline. It is mainly targeted by commercial fishers, but catch is highly variable.

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Stock Status Overview

Stock status determination
Jurisdiction Stock Stock status Indicators
Western Australia Western Australia Sustainable Catch, fishing mortality
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Stock Structure

Recently, three lines of evidence, based on phenotypic variation in age and growth, otolith chemistry and potential larval dispersal, suggest spatial patterns that may delineate natural subpopulations of Blue-eye Trevalla [Williams et al. 2017]. This research identified four geographically distinct subpopulations around the Australian coast: ‘West’ – comprising continental slope fishing grounds off Western Australia, South Australia and western Victoria to western Tasmania; ‘South’ – continental slope grounds around Tasmania and north eastwards to eastern Bass Strait; ‘East’ –  fishing grounds on the NSW continental slope and Tasmanian seamounts; and ‘Offshore’ – fishing grounds on the Lord Howe Rise [Williams et al. 2017].

The results of the study by Williams et al. [2017] led to separate analyses and recommended biological catches (RBCs) being determined for the slope and seamount stocks in eastern Australian waters but a global Total Allowable Catch (TAC) applied. Stock status is presented here at the management unit level - Eastern Australia and Western Australia.

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Stock Status

Western Australia

The stock assessment for Blue-eye Trevalla in the Western Australia management unit is based on an assessment of fishing mortality derived from catch curve analysis of representative samples of the age structure in the state-managed demersal fisheries (West Coast Demersal Scalefish Interim Managed Fishery, Joint Authority Southern Demersal Gillnet and Demersal Longline Managed Fishery and Wet Line Fishery [South Coast, Western Australia]). These fishing mortality (F) based assessments use reference levels (target, threshold and limit) based on ratios of natural mortality (M) for each species (Ftarget = 2/3M, Fthreshold = M and Flimit = 3/2M [DPIRD 2017]). Recent fishing mortality based assessments indicate that the estimated fishing mortality rate on Blue-eye Trevalla in this biological stock was stable at close to the threshold level in 2011 and 2014 [DPIRD unpubl.]. This indicates that the current fishing pressure is not having an unacceptable impact on the age structure of the population. The above evidence indicates that the biomass of this stock is unlikely to be depleted and that recruitment is unlikely to be impaired.

Blue-eye Trevalla catches from the state-managed demersal fisheries (Western Australia management unit) over the last 10-year period (2010–2019), ranged from 1.3–10.0 t, with a mean annual catch of 5.5 t per year [Gaughan and Santoro 2020]. The above evidence indicates that the current level of fishing mortality is unlikely to cause the stock to become recruitment impaired.

On the basis of the evidence provided above, the Western Australia management unit is classified as a sustainable stock.

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Biology

Blue-eye Trevalla biology [Baelde 1995, Stobutzki et al. 2009]

Biology
Species Longevity / Maximum Size Maturity (50 per cent)
Blue-eye Trevalla Eastern Australia: 42 years, 1 400 mm TL Western Australia: 65 years, 1 300 mm TL Males 620 mm TL, females 720 mm TL Males 8–9 years, females 11–12 years
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Distributions

Distribution of reported commercial catch of Blue-eye Trevalla

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Tables

Fishing methods
Western Australia
Commercial
Hand Line, Hand Reel or Powered Reels
Dropline
Indigenous
Unspecified
Charter
Rod and reel
Recreational
Handline
Management methods
Method Western Australia
Charter
Bag limits
Limited entry
Passenger restrictions
Spatial closures
Spatial zoning
Commercial
Gear restrictions
Limited entry
Spatial closures
Spatial zoning
Total allowable catch
Vessel restrictions
Indigenous
Laws of general application
Recreational
Bag limits
Licence (Recreational Fishing from Boat License)
Spatial closures
Catch
Western Australia
Commercial 9.80t
Indigenous Unknown
Recreational Insufficient data

Commonwealth – Commercial (Management Methods/Catch) Data provided for the Commonwealth align with the Commonwealth Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery for the 2018-19 financial year.

Commonwealth – Recreational The Commonwealth does not manage recreational fishing in Commonwealth waters. Recreational fishing in Commonwealth waters is managed by the state or territory immediately adjacent to those waters, under its management regulations.  

Commonwealth – Indigenous The Australian government does not manage non-commercial Indigenous fishing in Commonwealth waters, with the exception of Torres Strait. In general, non-commercial Indigenous fishing in Commonwealth waters is managed by the state or territory immediately adjacent to those waters

Western Australia – Recreational (Catch) Boat-based recreational catch is from 1 September 2017–31 August 2018. These data are derived from those reported in Ryan et al. 2019.

Western Australia – Recreational (Management Methods) A Recreational Fishing from Boat License is required for the use of a powered boat to fish or to transport catch or fishing gear to or from a land-based fishing location.

Western Australia – Indigenous (management methods) Subject to application of Section 211 of the Native Title Act 1993 (Cth), and the exemption from a requirement to hold a recreational fishing licence, the non-commercial take by Indigenous fishers is covered by the same arrangements as that for recreational fishing.

New South Wales – Commercial Dropline cannot be automated in New South Wales.

New South Wales – Recreational (Catch) Murphy et al. [2020].

New South Wales – Indigenous (Management Methods) https://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/fishing/aboriginal-fishing

Queensland – Indigenous (management methods) for more information see https://www.daf.qld.gov.au/business-priorities/fisheries/traditional-fishing

Tasmania – Recreational (Management Methods) In Tasmania, a recreational licence is required for fishers using dropline or longline gear, along with nets, such as gillnet or beach seine.

Tasmania – Charter (management Methods) In New South Wales there are four charter boat endorsement categories (Estuarine Fishing; Nearshore Bottom Fishing and Sportfishing; Gamefishing; and Deep Sea Bottom Fishing). The different categories have limitations on the species of fish they can access.

Tasmania – Indigenous (Management Methods) In Tasmania, aborigines engaged in aboriginal fishing activities in marine waters are exempt from holding recreational fishing licences, but must comply with all other fisheries rules as if they were licensed. Additionally, recreational bag and possession limits also apply. If using pots, rings, set lines or gillnets, Aborigines must obtain a unique identifying code (UIC). The policy document Recognition of Aboriginal Fishing Activities for issuing a UIC to a person for Aboriginal Fishing activity explains the steps to take in making an application for a UIC.

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Catch Chart

Commercial catch of Blue-eye Trevalla - note confidential catch not shown.

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References

  1. AFMA 2019, Harvest strategy framework for the Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery 2009 (amended 2019), Australian Fisheries Management Authority, Canberra.
  2. AFMA, 2014, South East Management Advisory Committee (SEMAC) draft minutes, meeting 14, 30-31 January 2014, Australian Fisheries Management Authority, Canberra.
  3. AFMA, 2018a, Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery (SESSF) South East Resource Assessment Group (SERAG), minutes, 19-21 September 2018, Hobart, Australian Fisheries Management Authority, Canberra.
  4. AFMA, 2018b, Species summaries for the Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery (SESSF): for stock assessments completed in 2018 in preparation for the 2019-20 fishing seasons, Australian Fisheries Management Authority, Canberra.
  5. AFMA, 2018c, Total allowable catch recommendations for Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery (SESSF) 2019-20 fishing year, Australian Fisheries Management Authority, Canberra.
  6. Baelde, P 1995, Blue-eye trevalla 1994, compiled by Pascale Baelde for the South East Fishery Assessment Group, Australian Fisheries Management Authority, Canberra.
  7. Burch, P, Althaus, F & Thomson, R 2019, Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery (SESSF) catches and discards for TAC purposes using data until 2018, Prepared for the SERAG Meeting, 3-4 December 2019, Hobart, CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere, Hobart, Tasmania.
  8. DPIRD 2017, North Coast demersal scalefish resource harvest strategy 2017 – 2021. Version 1.0. Fisheries Management Paper No. 285. Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development, Government of Western Australia, Perth, Australia. 35p.
  9. Gaughan, DJ and Santoro K (eds.) 2020. Status Reports of the Fisheries and Aquatic Resources of Western Australia 2018/19: The State of the Fisheries. Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development, Western Australia, Perth, Australia. 291p.
  10. Haddon, M 2016, Tier 4 analyses for selected species in the SESSF (data from 1986–2015), draft version, CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere, Hobart.
  11. Haddon, M and Sporcic, M 2018a, Draft Blue-Eye Trevalla Tier 5 Eastern Seamount Assessment: Catch-MSY Analysis, CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere, Hobart.
  12. Haddon, M and Sporcic, M 2018b, Draft Tier 5 Blue-Eye Trevalla Eastern Seamount Assessment: Age-Structured Stock Reduction Analysis, CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere, Hobart.
  13. Henry, GW and Lyle, JM 2003, The national recreational and Indigenous fishing survey. Fisheries Research and Development Corporation, Canberra.
  14. Kailola, PJ, Williams, MJ, Stewart, PC, Reichelt, RE, McNee, A and Grieve, C, 1993, Australian fisheries resources. Bureau of resource sciences, department of primary industries and energy. Fisheries Research and Development Corporation, Canberra, Australia.
  15. Murphy, J.J., Ochwada-Doyle, F.A., West, L.D., Stark, K.E. and Hughes, J.M., 2020. The NSW Recreational Fisheries Monitoring Program - survey of recreational fishing, 2017/18. NSW DPI - Fisheries Final Report Series No. 158.
  16. QFish, Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, www.qfish.gov.au
  17. Ryan, KL, Hall, NG, Lai, EK, Smallwood, CB, Tate, A, Taylor, SM, Wise, BS 2019, Statewide survey of boat-based recreational fishing in Western Australia 2017/18. Fisheries Research Report No. 297. Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development, Government of Western Australia, Perth. 
  18. Sporcic, M 2018, Tier 4 assessments for selected SESSF species (data to 2017), CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere, Hobart.
  19. Stobutzki, I, Patterson, H, Ward, P, Sampaklis, A, Sahlqvist, P, Moore, A and Viera, S 2009, Commonwealth Trawl and Scalefish Hook Sectors, in Wilson, D, Curtotti, R and Begg, G (eds) 2009, Fishery status reports 2009: status of fish stocks and fisheries managed by the Australian Government, Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics – Bureau of Rural Sciences, Canberra.
  20. Webley, J, McInnes, K, Teixeira, D, Lawson, A and Quinn, R 2015, Statewide Recreational Fishing Survey 2013-14, Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, Brisbane.
  21. West, LD, Stark, KE, Murphy, JJ, Lyle, JM and Ochwada-Doyle, FA 2015, Survey of recreational fishing in New South Wales and the ACT, 2013/14. Fisheries Final Report Series No. 149. NSW Department of Primary Industries, Wollongong.
  22. Williams, A, Hamer, P, Haddon, M, Robertson, S, Althaus, F, Green, M and Kool, J 2017, Determining Blue-eye Trevalla stock structure and improving methods for stock assessment, FRDC final report, FRDC project no. 2013/015

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