*

MORETON BAY BUGS (2020)

Thenus parindicus, Thenus australiensis, Thenus spp.

  • Anthony Roelofs (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, Queensland)
  • James Larcombe (Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences)
  • Mervi Kangas (Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development, Western Australia)
  • Brad Zeller (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, Queensland)

You are currently viewing a report filtered by jurisdiction. View the full report.

Toggle content

Summary

Reef Bug and Mud Bug, collectively known as Moreton Bay Bugs, are sustainable species distributed along the tropical and subtropical coast of Australia.

Toggle content

Stock Status Overview

Stock status determination
Jurisdiction Stock Stock status Indicators
Queensland East Coast Otter Trawl Fishery Sustainable

Catch, CPUE

Toggle content

Stock Structure

Reef Bug (Thenus australiensis) and Mud Bug (Thenus parindicus) are known collectively as ‘Moreton Bay Bugs’. Moreton Bay Bugs are distributed along the tropical and subtropical coast of Australia from northern New South Wales to Shark Bay in Western Australia [George and Griffin 1972]. No studies have been carried out on the biological stock structure of Australian Moreton Bay Bugs. The two species have overlapping distributions; may be trawled together; are undifferentiated in the catch; and are assessed together.

Given the uncertainty in biological stock structure, here assessment of stock status is presented at the management unit level—Northern Prawn Fishery, Torres Strait Prawn Fishery (Commonwealth) and East Coast Otter Trawl Fishery (Queensland); and the jurisdictional level—Western Australia.

Toggle content

Stock Status

East Coast Otter Trawl Fishery

Moreton Bay Bugs are targeted in the East Coast Otter Trawl Fishery (Queensland) (Qld ECOTF) management unit. They are taken predominantly by two fleets, one fleet north of 22­° S trawling for prawns and one fleet south of 22° S trawling for scallops. No formal stock assessment has been conducted. The 2014–19 catch shows a slight increasing trend [QFISH 2020]. Standardised catch rates in both fleets increased between 2002 and 2013 and then declined before stabilising in recent years (2015 to 2019) [Helidoniotis 2020]. After 2014 the trend between the fleets diverged and the catch rate from the northern fleet declined while the southern fleet catch rate increased, suggesting that targeting of Moreton Bay Bug was more pronounced in the southern fleet [Helidoniotis 2020]. Since 2010, retention of berried female bugs has been allowed, which has probably contributed to the higher subsequent catch rates. On average 90 per cent of the east coast Moreton Bay Bug catch is taken from areas open to trawling in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park (GBRMP) [Zeller et al. 2014]. Biophysical modelling estimated that in 2005 significant parts of the biomass (54 per cent of T. australiensis; and 45 per cent of T. parindicus) were within GBRMP trawl closures [Pitcher et al. 2007a]. Moreton Bay Bugs have a 45 day larval phase [Jones 1988]. It is likely that spawning adults in areas closed to fishing within GBRMP closures contribute recruits to other areas open to trawling. Recent ecological risk assessments have reported a low risk of the stock being recruitment overfished in the GBRMP [Pears et al. 2012], where harvesting pressure on the stock is greatest, and an intermediate risk of being classified as recruitment overfished south of the GBRMP [Jacobsen et al. 2018]. The above evidence indicates that the biomass of this stock is unlikely to be depleted and that recruitment is unlikely to be impaired.

The number of days on which Moreton Bay Bugs were caught and the number of boats catching Moreton Bay Bugs declined from 2000 to 2010, and have been relatively stable since [QFISH 2020]. Stable effort in high abundance grids since 2010 indicates that fishing mortality in high biomass areas has not increased substantially. Extensive trawl closures in the GBRMP ensure that a significant proportion of the biomass is not subject to fishing mortality. Based on yield-per-recruit analysis, capture at ≥ 75 mm CW allows Moreton Bay Bugs to spawn before they enter the fishery [Courtney 1997]. Square-mesh cod end bycatch reduction devices (BRDs) were made mandatory in the Scallop Fishery in 2015, allowing juvenile Moreton Bay Bugs to escape trawl capture and reducing incidental fishing mortality [Courtney et al. 2008]. Moreton Bay Bugs are also known to survive discarding well [Hill et al. 1998]. The above evidence indicates that the current level of fishing mortality is unlikely to cause the stock to become recruitment impaired.

On the basis of the evidence provided above, the East Coast Otter Trawl Fishery (Queensland) management unit is classified as a sustainable stock.

Toggle content

Biology

Moreton Bay Bug biology [Courtney 1997, Jones 1988]

Biology
Species Longevity / Maximum Size Maturity (50 per cent)
MORETON BAY BUGS ~7 years T. australiensis: Males 106 mm CW, Females 124 mm CW T. parindicus: Males 87 mm CW, Females 103 mm CW T. australiensis: Female 82 mm CW T. parindicus: Female 75 mm CW
Toggle content

Distributions

Distribution of reported commercial catch of Moreton Bay Bugs
Toggle content

Tables

Fishing methods
Queensland
Commercial
Trawl
Recreational
Diving
Traps and Pots
Management methods
Method Queensland
Commercial
Effort limits
Gear restrictions
Limited entry
Size limit
Spatial closures
Vessel restrictions
Recreational
Size limit
Catch
Queensland
Commercial 555.26t
Indigenous No catch
Recreational Unknown

Commonwealth – Recreational The Commonwealth Government does not manage recreational fishing. Recreational fishing in Commonwealth waters is managed by the states or territory immediately adjacent to those waters, under their management regulations. 

Commonwealth – Indigenous The Commonwealth Government does not manage non-commercial Indigenous fishing (with the exception of the Torres Strait). In general, non-commercial Indigenous fishing in Commonwealth waters is managed by the states or territory immediately adjacent to those waters. In the Torres Strait, both commercial and non-commercial Indigenous fishing is managed by the Torres Strait Protected Zone Joint Authority (PZJA) through the Australian Fisheries Management Authority (Commonwealth), Department of Agriculture Fisheries and Forestry (Queensland) and the Torres Strait Regional Authority. The PZJA also manages non-Indigenous commercial fishing in the Torres Strait.

Queensland – Indigenous (management methods) for more information see https://www.daf.qld.gov.au/business-priorities/fisheries/traditional-fishing

Toggle content

Catch Chart

Commercial catch of MORETON BAY BUGS - note confidential catch not shown
Toggle content

References

  1. Courtney, AJ 1997, A study of the biological parameters associated with yield optimisation of Moreton Bay Bugs, Thenus spp., final report (project 92/102), Queensland Department of Primary Industries, Brisbane.
  2. Courtney, AJ 2002, The status of Queensland’s Moreton Bay Bug (Thenus spp.) and Balmain Bug (Ibacus spp.) stocks, Queensland Government, Department of Primary Industries, Brisbane.
  3. Courtney, AJ, Campbell, MJ, Roy, DP, Tonks, ML, Chillcott, KE and Kyne, PM 2008, Round scallops and square meshes: a comparison of four codend types on the catch rates of target species and by-catch in the Queensland (Australia) saucer scallop (Amusium balloti) trawl fishery, Marine and Freshwater Research, 59: 849–864.
  4. Gaughan, DJ and Santoro, K (eds) 2018, Status Reports of the Fisheries and Aquatic Resources of Western Australia 2016/17, The State of the Fisheries.. Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development, Western Australia.
  5. George, RW and Griffin, DJG 1972, The shovel nosed lobsters of Australia, Australian Natural History, September 1972, 227–231.
  6. Griffiths, S, Kenyon, R, Bulman, C, Dowdney, J, Williams, A, Sporcic, M and Fuller, M 2007, Ecological risk assessment for the effects of fishing: report for the Northern Prawn Fishery, report for the Australian Fisheries Management Authority, Canberra.
  7. Helidoniotis, F 2020, Standardised catch rates for Queensland Moreton Bay bugs (Thenus spp.), Technical Report, Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, Brisbane.
  8. Hill, B, Blaber, S, Wassenberg, T, and Milton, D 1998, Composition and Fate of Discards, in I Poiner, J Glaister, R Pitcher, C Burridge, T Wassenberg, N Gribble, B Hill, S Blaber, D Milton, D Brewer, and N Ellis (eds), The Environmental Effects of Prawn Trawling in the Far Northern Section of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park: 1991-1996, CSIRO Division of Marine Research, Cleveland.
  9. Jacobsen, I, Zeller, B, Dunning, M, Garland, A, Courtney T and Jebreen, E, An Ecological Risk Assessment of the Southern Queensland East Coast Otter Trawl Fishery and River and Inshore Beam Trawl Fishery, Fisheries Queensland, Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, Brisbane.
  10. Jones, CM 1988, The biology and behaviour of bay lobsters, Thenus spp. (Decapoda: Scyllaridae), in northern Queensland, Australia, PhD thesis, University of Queensland, Brisbane.
  11. Milton, DA, Fry, GC, Kuhnert, P, Tonks, M, Zhou, S and Zhu, M 2010, Assessing data poor resources: developing a management strategy for byproduct species in the Northern Prawn Fishery, final report to the Fisheries Research and Development Corporation, project 2006/008.
  12. Pears, RJ, Morison, AK, Jebreen, EJ, Dunning, M, Pitcher, CR, Courtney, AJ, Houlden, B and Jacobsen, IP 2012, Ecological risk assessment of the East Coast Otter Trawl Fishery in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park: Technical Report, Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, Townsville.
  13. Pitcher, CR, Doherty, P, Arnold, P, Hooper, J, Gribble, N, Bartlett, C, Browne, M, Campbell, N, Cannard, T, Cappo, M, Carini, G, Chalmers, S, Cheers, S, Chetwynd, D, Colefax, A, Coles, R, Cook, S, Davie, P, De’ath, G, Devereux, D, Done, B, Donovan, T, Ehrke, B, Ellis, N, Ericson, G, Fellegara, I, Forcey, K, Furey, M, Gledhill, D, Good, N, Gordon, S, Haywood, M, Jacobsen, I, Johnson, J, Jones, M, Kinninmoth, S, Kistle, S, Last, P, Leite, A, Marks, S, McLeod, I, Ozkowicz, S, Rose, C, Seabright, D, Sheils, J, Sherlock, M, Skelton, P, Smith, D, Smith, G, Speare, P, Stowar, M, Strickland, C, Sutcliffe, P, Van der Geest, C, Venables, W, Walsh, C, Wassenberg, T, Welna, A, and Yearsley, G 2007, Seabed biodiversity on the continental shelf of the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area, AIMS/CSIRO/QM/QDPI CRC Reef Research Task final report.
  14. Pitcher, CR, Haywood, M, Hooper, J, Coles, R, Bartlett, C, Browne, M, Cannard, T, Carini, G, Carter, A, Cheers, S, Chetwynd, D, Colefax, A, Cook, S, Davie, P, Ellis, N, Fellegara, I, Forcey, K, Furey, M, Gledhill, D, Hendriks, P, Jacobsen, I, Johnson, J, Jones, M, Last, P, Marks, S, McLeod, I, Sheils, J, Sheppard, J, Smith, G, Strickland, C, Van der Geest, C, Venables, W, Wassenberg, T and Yearsley, G 2007, Mapping and characterisation of the biotic and physical attributes of the Torres Strait ecosystem, CSIRO/QM/QDPI CRC Torres Strait Task final report.
  15. QFish, Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, www.qfish.gov.au
  16. Turnbull, C and Rose, CL 2007, Towards ecologically sustainable management of the Torres Strait Prawn Fishery, CRC Torres Strait Task T1.5 final report, Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries, Queensland.
  17. Zeller, B, Kangas, M, and Larcombe, J, 2014, Moreton Bay Bug Thenus australiensis, T. parindicus, in M Flood, I Stobutzki, J Andrews, C Ashby, G Begg, R Fletcher, C Gardner, L Georgeson, S Hansen, K Hartmann, P Hone, P Horvat, L Maloney, B McDonald, A Moore, A Roelofs, K Sainsbury, T Saunders, T Smith, C Stewardson, J Stewart and B Wise (eds) 2014, Status of key Australian fish stocks reports 2014, Fisheries Research and Development Corporation, Canberra.
  18. Zeller, B, Kangas, M, and Larcombe, J, 2018, Moreton Bay Bug Thenus australiensis, T. parindicus, in Carolyn Stewardson, James Andrews, Crispian Ashby, Malcolm Haddon, Klaas Hartmann, Patrick Hone, Peter Horvat, Stephen Mayfield, Anthony Roelofs, Keith Sainsbury, Thor Saunders, John Stewart, Simon Nicol and Brent Wise (eds) 2018, Status of Australian fish stocks reports 2018, Fisheries Research and Development Corporation, Canberra.

Downloadable reports

Click the links below to view reports from other years for this fish.